Month: December 2018

According to TfL, Diana is not even a number

Transport for London is massaging figures in a deliberate attempt to deceive citizens. And it starts from the top:

  • LastNotLost has looked at at Khan’s claim that he has completed 100km of QuietWays. Besides the fact that most of the work involved painting Qs on existing London Cycle Network routes, LastNotLost has discovered that many claimed completed routes in South West London are not completed and some are not even started. He charitably writes: “Most of the quietway works are carried out by local boroughs, using money from TfL.  I suspect TfL has got its records muddled in the cycle of quietway works planned – designed – constructed – signposted – complete, possibly confusing the release of funds to do final works with works then being complete.
  • TfL’ press office gave the Evening Standard’s Ross Lydall wrong figures of pedestrian fatalities caused by TfL regulated buses (five instead of the actual seven), as Tom Kearney reported
  • In the H,S&E Quarterly Report for April-June 2018, TfL states that four cyclists were killed in the period. The actual figure is five, as listed on our public spreadsheet 
  • The fatalities figures released by TfL NINE Months after the calendar year are always below the actual number, because TfL excludes victims who died in hospital more than 30 days after the crash, and people who were killed on roads that for some arcane planning reasons are deemed private (but are not). For example, according to TfL, Diana Barimore is not a road traffic victim, because she died 33 days after being knocked down in Fulham.

    According to TfL, Diana is not even a number.

 

It seems that Sadiq Khan wants to reach #VisionZeroLDN by lying about the numbers.

 

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Sadiq, just as Boris, keeps prioritising ” smoothing traffic flow”

Sadiq Khan, two months before being elected Mayor:

I know that many local people feel that King’s Cross traffic gyratory system desperately needs redesigning, with concerns around safety for all road users and pollution in the densely populated area.

Transport for London (TfL) has been consulting on a redesign since 2011 and that they intend to consult on a high level proposal shortly and on final details in 2017.  I understands there are frustrations around delays with the process and I will contact TfL to seek reassurances around the timetable and that local people are being properly consulted.

As Daniel Zylbersztajn reports, The Wait continues for Changes to the Kings Cross Gyratory:

“After a consultation in 2015 by TfL, the third in 20 years, TfL suggested dramatic changes in 2016. It involved changing streets adding cycle lanes, adding crossings.

Of 1.042 respondents,

  • 81 % supported additional pedestrian crossings at various junctions
  • improvement to pedestrian experience and cycling rated as highest priorities
  • 70 % supported overall proposals
  • 63% supported some two-way streets and changing single lane streets
  • 63% supported the reduction of traffic an improvement of the environment
  • 67% supported new cycling facilities including counterflow lanes for bicycles”

Yet as 2018 draws to a close, nothing is being done. Nigel Hardy, TfL’s Head of Programme Sponsorship admits that TfL is more concerned about traffic flows than safety and pollution; he states:

“The gyratory system runs through one of London’s busiest areas and construction work for our planned transformation needs careful coordination with a number of other significant schemes, including HS2. Work on the gyratory at Judd Street started this week and work at Midland Road is set to begin over the coming months, with further consultation and construction at other sections of the gyratory in 2019.”

Please note that Judd Street/Midland Road have nothing to do with the Gyratory.

Daniel cites another example of TfL prioritising the convenience of people poisoning us over our safety:

 I had found through day-to-day observation over three years now (it is on my daughter’s way to school, which I frequent five days a week) that 90 per cent of Southbound pedestrians, amongst them many school children, did not use the push bottom operated crossing near Weston Rise at all, in spite of it being there. In other words, the local public condemned the crossing as totally not fit for its needs.

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Pentonville Road (looking East) – Weston Rise. Far left see bus stop. In front pedestrian traffic light, that must be operated individually to cross each side. Weston Rise on the right. In order to to reach the bus stop one must walk down 40 meters. wait for green to cross West Bound Lane, and then the same for East-bound lane, and then walk back 60-70 meter

However nearby there is a pedestrian crossing with much shorter red phases; why?

A crossing 250 meter up at Rodney Street – Pentonville Road – Penton Rise allows crossing in one go, and the traffic light is phased in a faster cycle after being triggered. The reason? It is cars that are waiting in Rodney Street, not pedestrians. Cars there trigger a movement sensitive traffic light and the wait is relatively short.

One cannot help thinking that all these delays are the consequence of Sadiq’s fear that traffic jams may imperil his reappointment as Mayor.
Problem is the list of broken promises is so long that most Londoners are fed up with the BS.